The Basics to Consider Before Pushing Through With a Merger

Going through with a merger is much like getting married, in the sense that you should take ample time to get to know the person or company you will be legally binding yourself with.

 Though it’s exciting to think about the additional efficiencies your business will gain in absorbing or being absorbed by another company – such as increased capital, wider market reach, economies of scale in production and manufacturing, increased technological capacity, and more – it is important to get to know the company you are merging with first. You want to make sure that it’s a safe and sound transaction, and mutually advantageous to both parties. You wouldn’t want to get married to a person with skeletons in the closet, after all.

The following two tenets are probably the most important things to consider when talks of a merger are in the works.

1. Ask yourself the question: are your businesses a good fit? Why?

How would partnering with each other improve your brand equity, as well as your bottom line? Here, you get to kill two birds with one stone. The first job is to assess how reputable the partner company is deemed by the general public. Would partnering with them align with your company’s values and ethos? Will you still be regarded by the market as the honourable enterprise you have always been seen as, or maybe even improve how you are perceived? Do the brands banding together create the image you have always wanted to be seen by your customers?

Also, will the combination of your businesses increase efficiency overall? Will it contribute to an improvement of your business? Will it be a boost to the company’s overall profitability? Answering these questions in a positive way are the basic and most important concerns you need to cover from the beginning.

2. Take into account all the objective financial considerations.

Of course, there are a lot of figures that need to be studied when getting into a merger. Basically, you have to make sure that a company’s assets, liabilities, and equity are all that they declare them to be. Make sure that assets standings are accurate, are not over declared, major capital investments such as equipment or real estate values are declared as well as corresponding depreciation and amortization for these, not to mention other deeds, title policies, and permits.

Liabilities are also very important to consider. Make sure you have a detailed schedule of all short and long term debt, a full list of creditors and suppliers, corresponding terms and interest rates, and most importantly, the company’s current standing in terms of ability to pay these creditors.

These details can be pretty tedious; so it is wise to hire the appropriate accountants, lawyers, and due diligence companies such as Diligence International Group. It may be an expense for you up front, but it should be seen as an investment – it is better to have all important details ironed out in the beginning before getting into any binding contracts.

These two are probably the two basic pillars in assessing and properly evaluating your merger. The rest may fall under these two categories, such as company culture and corresponding effects on your human resource team, their corporate social responsibility and environmental sustainability practices, patents and other intellectual property concerns, among others.

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